“Talking with Your Teens About Sex” Part 2 (Teen pregnancy)

 

The number of teens giving birth in the U.S. dropped again in 2010, according to a government report, with nearly every state seeing a decrease. Nationally, the rate fell 9 percent to about 34 per 1,000 girls ages 15 through 19, and the drop was seen among all racial and ethnic groups. Mississippi continues to have the highest teen birth rate, with 55 births per 1,000 girls. New Hampshire has the lowest rate at just under 16 births per 1,000 girls.

By Amanda Peterson Beadle on Apr 10, 2012 at 1:50 pm

This is the lowest national rate for teen births since the Centers for Disease Control began tracking it in 1940, and CDC officials attributed the decline to pregnancy prevention efforts. Other reports show that teenagers are having less sex and using contraception more often. Studies have backed this up. Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle found that teenagers who received some type of comprehensive sex education were 60 percent less likely to get pregnant or get someone else pregnant. And in 2007, a federal report showed that abstinence-only programs had “no impacts on rates of sexual abstinence.”

But 37 states require sex education that includes abstinence, 26 of which require that abstinence be stressed as the best method. Additionally, research shows that abstinence-only strategies could deter contraceptive use among teenagers, thus increasing their risk of unintended pregnancy.

For example, take the states with the highest and lowest teen pregnancy rates. Mississippi does not require sex education in schools, but when it is taught, abstinence-only education is the state standard. New Mexico, which has the second highest teen birth rate, does not require sex ed and has no requirements on what should be included when it is taught. server ip . New Hampshire, on the other hand, requires comprehensive sex education in schools that includes abstinence and information about condoms and contraception.

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“Teens and Sex” Part 1 (Talking about sex with your teen)

There are, to be sure, lots of books on the subject of sexuality, and lots of studies into the awakening awareness of the opposite sex. Let’s start with, “Facts on American Teens’ Sexual and Reproductive Health, February 2012”, Facts on American Teens’ Sexual and Reproductive Health

The good news is teens are waiting longer to have sex and more are using birth control during their first sexual encounter.  In 1995 some 19% of teens reported having sex before age 15.  That number declined to 11% for females and 14% for males in 2006 – 2008.

Although only an average of 13% of teens have had sex by age 15, most initiate sex in their later teen years.  By their 19th birthday, 70% of teens, both male and female, have had sexual intercourse.

Another piece of good news is that 78% of females and 85% of males reported using contraceptives the first time they had sex.

So it all boils down to one simple undeniable fact.

People have sex and your child’s first sexual experience will probably be in the next few years.  It may have happened already.

So the next question is, “When should I talk to my child about sex”? The answer may shock some of you.  Now is the time to start the conversation.

There is considerable information and a fine resource starting with,  Sex Talk – Have the Sex Talk With Kids of Any Age.

We live in a world that is immersed in, and preoccupied with sex. We use it to sell perfume, cars, clothes and every other commodity.  The television and newspapers are full of it.  The magazine rack is covered with overt sexuality.  If your children don’t see the playboy channel at your house, because you happen to have higher ideals than to permit it in your house, then they will see it at the neighbor’s house.

For some reason, our society seems to have evolved with a belief that if we hide something away from our children, they won’t get into it.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  We persist with some silly notion that educating our children properly will hasten the onset of sexual awareness.  Believe me, nothing is sillier.  The onset of sexual awareness is taken care of by the natural flow of hormones rampaging unchecked through the teen age body.  And nothing is destined to cause you more trouble as a parent than to try to hide things from your children.

So now is the time to start talking.  It should be open, frank, and honest.  Babies don’t come from the stork and your children will get educated, if not by you, then by someone else who may or may not teach them the values you wan them to have.  So best to start talking now! Crazaberamer .

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